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The Top 14 Luxury Cars of 2019

10th July 2019 // By Alexandra Cheney

Porsche 911 Carrera 4S Cabriolet

Finding the space between instantly recognizable and polarizing appears to be a longstanding specialty at Porsche. The 911 Carrera 4S Cabriolet is likely the last non-hybrid model.

Considering many collectors tend to have several, the plethora of possibilities, while overwhelming at first, allows for a choose-your-own-adventure set of options to make every vehicle as unique as its owner.

Although a convertible, the all-wheel-drive version with the Porsche Active Suspension Management sport suspension (read: stiffer springs and sway bars as well as lower ride height) increases lateral support and stability.

While off-roading may not be the first activity that comes to mind, all-wheel drive will aid in navigating dirt, gravel or snow very effectively. The popularity of paddle shifting is occasionally seductive, especially so on a drop-top. Save the nose and side mirrors and opt for the lift kit and folding mirrors, and add on the Sport Chrono Package, which includes a series of options like sport and wet.

A curious technology, ‘wet’ checks the water level on the road and will automatically adjust the rear spoiler and differential, as well as the throttle. The customizing doesn’t stop at the car itself. Owners can pick theirs up at one of the Porsche Experience Centers in Los Angeles and Atlanta, or at either of the factory headquarters in Leipzig and Zuffenhausen, Germany.

Key facts

Price: From $133,400
Engine: 3.0-liter turbocharged flat-six
Power: 443 hp

Lamborghini Huracán EVO

Typically, supercars end their model cycles much like iPhones, phased out for the newest, fastest, strongest one. Lamborghini undertook a fascinating strategy with its entry-level, biggest-selling, mid-cycle Huracán.

At year five, when most manufacturers wrestle up 10 more horsepower and a racing stripe, Lamborghini leaned in and added active aerodynamics, rear-wheel steering and Lamborghini Dinamica Veicolo Integrata (LDVI), a centralized supercomputer that monitors current car specs and driver input to predict and adapt to circumstance à la minute.

The company claims seven times the aerodynamic downforce and efficiency of the outgoing Huracán Coupe, courtesy of a new diffuser and air curtain, front spoiler and rear ducktail spoiler and diffuser, as well as a repositioned exhaust complete with titanium intake valves.

Piquing interest mid-cycle is tricky, but Lamborghini gave people what they want: an 8.4-in touchscreen and Apple CarPlay integration. While the cup holders are still not large enough to hold anything more than a small coffee, the phenomenally giant launch button more than compensates.

Key facts

Price: From $261,274
Engine: 5.2-liter naturally aspirated V10
Power: 640 hp

Standout feature: Lamborghini Huracán EVO has active aerodynamics, rear-wheel steering and Lamborghini Dinamica Veicolo Integrata (LDVI), a centralized supercomputer that monitors current car specs and driver input to predict and adapt to circumstance à la minute.