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DeWitt Present its Titanium Twenty-8-Eight Skeleton Tourbillon Watch

The DeWitt calibre DW8028 uses age-old, recognized and highly reliable technical parameters in its construction: 18’000 A/h, a variable-inertia balance, a 44° angle escapement and 72 hours power reserve. Entirely produced in-house, this manually wound Tourbillon is equipped with a Swiss anchor escapement and a Straumann Hairspring® with Phillips terminal curve made out of an unbreakable, self-compensating, non-oxidizing, anti-magnetic alloy and sequenced at 2.5 Hz. The perfect homogeneity and incredibly precise flat rolling of the Hairspring (0,0001 mm) guarantee an extremely high precision to the mechanism. The balance, as well as the escape wheel and the anchor are made of 18-carat yellow gold.T8 Skeleton Tourbillon_T81

The Twenty-8-Eight Skeleton Tourbillon does not intend to compete with the ultra-skinny and fragile skeletons where as much material as possible was taken out of the construction. The architecture of DeWitt’s skeleton remains deliberately strong and is therefore very well balanced with the design of the case which features 48 imperial columns. A typical feature of practically all DeWitt masterpieces. The carved-out main plate, a sand-brushed nickel silver base with black gold surface finishing and a yellow gold inscription of the calibre reference, is a marvellous labyrinth of curves, circles and straight lines. Meandering across the movement, the lucky observer will suddenly land on a stunning skeletonised “W” logo positioned at 9 o’clock. The play on depths, perspectives and layers is a typical feature of DeWitt designs and the Twenty-8-Eight Skeleton Tourbillon is no exception. The skeletonised “W” logo is actually duplicated on the lower part of the movement in order to offer these interesting volumes when admiring the movement from either side of the watch. But however robust the foundations, your eyes will inevitably be dragged deep into the movement and the captivating finesse of its ticking mechanics. You will marvel at the Tourbillon as it gracefully rotates on its axis, held in place by a long, slender and circulargrained Art Déco bridge.